Magazine Issue
October 1 2017
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
Contributors
AN FP SPECIAL REPORT: In May, Foreign Policy’s Africa editor, Ty McCormick, traveled with photojournalist Nichole Sobecki to Agadez, Niger, an age-old trading post and a gateway to the Sahara that has become the epicenter of the modern human-smugglin
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min read
The Iraqis Who Fled Mosul
STANDING BY THE ROWS OF TENTS that line the dusty plains of northern Iraq, groups of men and children cover their faces from the searing sun. Twenty-five miles to the west, their home city of Mosul lies in ruins after a brutal nine-month battle betwe
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min readPolitics
A Silk Road Marriage
ALMATY, KAZAKHSTAN—As the sun sets over the city’s snowcapped mountains, Yerbolat and May Ospanov settle into the gray sofa. May slides her hands over Yerbolat’s, which lie clasped on his knee. Then, with a precision honed through countless recitatio
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min read
Language Haven
BALTIMORE—On June 29, 1987, Jermin Laviera attended her first English-language lesson still wearing her wedding dress. Though she had just arrived in Baltimore from Venezuela eight days earlier, acquiring the ability to communicate in her new home wa
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readSociety
Undocumented on Patrol
FORT WORTH, TEXAS—Jaime Carrillo emerges from his faded pink house wearing blue jeans and a black cowboy hat. After a long day at work laying cement for city streets, he is ready for a second shift—this time as a volunteer for the Fort Worth Police D
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min readPolitics
A Refugee Without a River
AMMAN, JORDAN—Tagreed Daftar’s thick black hair falls past her shoulders, stark against her bright floral blouse. She is fidgety in the crisply lit conference room at the CARE relief agency’s east Amman center, where refugees come for counseling, the
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readPolitics
Why Do Some Countries Get Away With Taking Fewer Refugees?
interview by KAVITHA SURANA With the signing of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the world put in place for the first time a system for defining refugees, setting out their rights, and granting them asylum. But in the face of
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
They Can’t Go Home Again
Iranians living in America reflect on their complicated relationship with their native country.
Foreign Policy Magazine15 min read
This Land Is Their Land
IMMIGRATION IS INEVITABLE. WHEN WILL THE WEST LEARN THAT IT PROMISES SALVATION—NOT DESTRUCTION?
Foreign Policy Magazine13 min read
Highway Through Hell
THE HUMAN-SMUGGLING ROUTE ACROSS THE SAHARA MAY HAVE BEEN THE DEADLIEST ON EARTH. THEN EUROPE MADE THE JOURNEY EVEN MORE TREACHEROUS BY TRYING TO SHUT IT DOWN.
Foreign Policy Magazine11 min read
A Voice in the Night
HOW A SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR IN SPAIN IS HELPING RESCUE REFUGEES WITH LITTLE MORE THAN FERVOR AND A PHONE.
Foreign Policy Magazine13 min read
On the Edge of Afghanistan
A DECIMATED ECONOMY, A RESURGENT TALIBAN, AND GROWING TENSIONS WITH IRAN ARE DRIVING DISENCHANTED AFGHANS TO SEEK OPPORTUNITIES ABROAD. AND FOR MANY IT’S THEIR ONLY OPTION.
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min readPolitics
The Disturbing Paradox of Presidential Power
“THE EXECUTIVE POWER shall be vested in a President of the United States of America.”—Article II, Section 1, U.S. Constitution Debates over executive authority generally take place at the margins of the president’s powers. Our collective understandi
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min readSociety
Trump’s Massive Miscalculation
NO ISSUE IS AS CLOSELY ASSOCIATED with U.S. President Donald Trump’s ascendancy as immigration, but those who thought his only concern was stopping illegal immigration weren’t paying close attention. Trump’s ugly campaign rhetoric may have focused on
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min read
A Shrinking Island
A tolerant and diverse cosmopolitan center, Beirut is a reminder of what the Arab world could be again.
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min read
What a Just Immigration Policy Looks Like
THE SOMALI-BRITISH WRITER WARSAN SHIRE begins her poem “Home” with the line, “No one leaves home unless / home is the mouth of a shark.” Whatever the inciting forces are that propel people to undertake what is inevitably a dangerous, expensive, and