Nautilus
18 min read
Self-Improvement

Why Your Brain Hates Other People: And how to make it think differently.

As a kid, I saw the 1968 version of Planet of the Apes. As a future primatologist, I was mesmerized. Years later I discovered an anecdote about its filming: At lunchtime, the people playing chimps and those playing gorillas ate in separate groups. It’s been said, “There are two kinds of people in the world: those who divide the world into two kinds of people and those who don’t.” In reality, there’s lots more of the former. And it can be vastly consequential when people are divided into Us and Them, ingroup and outgroup, “the people” (i.e., our kind) and the Others. The core of Us/Them-ing is
The New York Times
10 min read
Religion & Spirituality

Noam Chomsky: On Trump And The State Of The Union

Over the past few months, as the disturbing prospect of a Trump administration became a disturbing reality, I decided to reach out to Noam Chomsky, the philosopher whose writing, speaking and activism has for more than 50 years provided unparalleled insight and challenges to the American and global political systems. Our conversation, as it appears here, took place as a series of email exchanges over the past two months. Chomsky is the author of numerous best-selling political works, translated into scores of languages. Among his most recent books are “Hegemony or Survival,” “Failed States,”
Popular Science
3 min read
Psychology

How To Smile Without Looking Like A Creep, According To Scientists

Not all smiles are created equal. tonipostius via Flickr How much teeth should you show when you smile? How wide should your grin be, and what if it’s crooked? Using a variety of computer-animated faces, researchers from the University of Minnesota have done their best to isolate the traits of a winning smile. At first glance, this may seem like a laughing matter. But for people with paralysis or other medical conditions, being physically unable to smile can cause communication problems, anxiety, and depression. The new study, published today in PLOS One, could help doctors who perform facial
Mic
5 min read
Self-Improvement

5 Smart Brain Hacks To Help You Feel — And Project — More Positivity At Work

Do you really love your job? Are you truly engaged in your work? If you are able to answer “yes” to both questions, you’re in the minority. Less than 30% of millennials responding to a 2016 Gallup survey indicated they felt engaged at work and 16% even said they were actively disengaged. Now, to improve your feelings about work, it might require some changes — like a promotion or pay bump — or even a big job switch, especially early in your career. But the truth for at least some is that sometimes the problem is not the job but your own attitudes, and being more satisfied must start with you.
Newsweek
16 min read
Politics

ISIS's Indoctrinated Kids: A Future of Violent Jihad?

The blue-eyed boy with the chubby cheeks still talks about the after-school movies he used to love so much. This was three years ago, when he was just 9 and living on the outskirts of Raqqa, in northern Syria. Sometimes, his father would take him and his little brother to an outdoor makeshift theater downtown, or he’d go with his teacher and classmates. They’d sit on plastic chairs and munch on cookies in front of a big-screen TV shielded from the sun by an umbrella. The films varied, but the plot was always the same: Black-clad members of the Islamic State militant group (ISIS) “liberated” ci
The Wall Street Journal
3 min read
Religion & Spirituality

How To Be A Buddhist In Today’s World, By The @DalaiLama

Once people adopt a religion, they should practice it sincerely. Truly believing in God, Buddha, Allah or Shiva should inspire one to be an honest human being. Some people claim to have faith in their religion but act counter to its ethical injunctions. They pray for the success of their dishonest and corrupt actions, asking God or Buddha for help in covering up their wrongdoings. There is no point in such people describing themselves as religious.Today the world faces a crisis related to lack of respect for spiritual principles and ethical values. Such virtues cannot be forced on society by l
Entrepreneur
2 min read
Time Management

Should You Ignore Your Emails or Get Them to Zero?

Let your emails pile up, or fight to achieve inbox zero? Two entrepreneurs from different schools of thought explain the reasoning behind their email-management methods.  Related: 4 Tips to Better Manage Your Email Inbox “The day I realized my email was not my to-do list but just other people’s to-do list for me, I had this incredible realization: Constantly managing an inbox is like doing someone else’s homework! The minute I stopped running my day based on my email, I immediately became more effective. And it’s not about ignoring messages; being responsive is really important, and it’s indic
The Wall Street Journal
4 min read
Psychology

Harness The Power Of Trash Talk To Improve Your Performance

One recent evening after work, Wallace Bruce set off for a run. The 30-year-old actor had taken a few months off from exercising, so he planned an easy loop through his Los Angeles neighborhood.He was five minutes from his house and had just broken a sweat when a man with white hair, also jogging, blew past him. Mr. Bruce estimated him to be in his late 70s. Ten yards down the road the man turned his head back and shouted: “Keep up… if you can!” Although Mr. Bruce chuckled to himself, he immediately picked up his pace. “A ‘game-on’ type of instinct kicked in,” he says. “I thought, ‘Alright old
Nautilus
7 min read

Where Did Time Come From, and Why Does It Seem to Flow?

Paul Davies has a lot on his mind—or perhaps more accurate to say in his mind. A physicist at Arizona State University, he does research on a wide range of topics, from the abstract fields of theoretical physics and cosmology to the more concrete realm of astrobiology, the study of life in places beyond Earth. Nautilus sat down for a chat with Davies, and the discussion naturally drifted to the subject of time, a long-standing research interest of his. Here is a partial transcript of the interview, edited lightly for length and clarity. There might be some pre-geometry, that would give rise to
Nautilus
8 min read

Why You Need Emoji: Emojis are the body language of the digital age.

The use of emojis has become a global phenomenon. By 2015, over 6 billion emojis1 were being sent every day by over 90 percent of the world’s online population.2 Emoji, today, dwarfs even the reach of English. For some, emojis are prompting warnings about the death of real language. Professional art critic and contrarian Jonathan Jones, writing in The Guardian newspaper in 2015, contended that “After millennia of painful improvement, from illiteracy to Shakespeare and beyond, humanity is rushing to throw it all away.” Emoji is, he proclaimed, a “huge step back for humanity.” His derision is cl
NPR
3 min read

Is Your Boss Too Controlling? Many Employees Clash With Micromanagers

Micromanagement is routinely the top complaint people have about their bosses, and in today's good job market where workers have more options, that's a bigger problem for employers. People might have their own definition of when a manager crosses into being too controlling, but most people would probably agree that Marjon Bell's former boss would fit. On her first day on a marketing job at a Virginia Beach, Va., insurance company, Bell's boss sent an email barring employees from bringing cell phones to the office. The email said that moms, especially, spent too much time on their phones checki
Nautilus
24 min read
Science

How We Really Tamed the Dog: A daring experiment builds a new tame species in just 60 years.

Suppose you wanted to build the perfect dog from scratch. What would be the key ingredients in the recipe? Loyalty and smarts would be musts. Cuteness would be as well, perhaps with gentle eyes, and a curly, bushy tail that wags in joy in anticipation of your appearance. And you might toss in a mutt-like mottled fur that seems to say, “I may not be beautiful, but you know that I love you and I need you.” You needn’t bother trying. Lyudmila Trut and Dmitri Belyaev have already built it for you. The perfect dog. Except it’s not a dog, it’s a fox. A domesticated one. They built it quickly—mind-bo
The New York Times
6 min read
Self-Improvement

What Cookies and Meth Have in Common

This article is accompanied by an illustration by Josh Cochran that is available at no charge to clients of The New York Times Op-Ed service. MODERN HUMANS HAVE DESIGNED THE PERFECT ENVIRONMENT FOR DRUG AND FOOD ADDICTION. As a psychiatrist, I have yet to meet a patient who enjoys being addicted to drugs or compulsively overeating. Why would anyone continue to use recreational drugs despite the medical consequences and social condemnation? What makes someone eat more and more in the face of poor health? One answer is that modern humans have designed the perfect environment to create both of th
The Atlantic
3 min read
Religion & Spirituality

The Church of CrossFit

“You always know if someone goes to Harvard or if they go to CrossFit—they’ll tell you,” said Casper ter Kuile, a ministry innovation fellow at Harvard Divinity School. “It’s really interesting that evangelical zeal they have. They want to recruit you.” CrossFit is his favorite example of a trend he has noticed: how, in the midst of the decline of religious affiliation in America, and the rise of isolation and loneliness, many ostensibly non-religious communities are “functioning in ways that look a little bit religious,” he explained on Friday at the Aspen Ideas Festival, which is co-hosted b
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Psychology

How Entrepreneurs Can Resist Shiny-Object Syndrome

Have you ever worked with someone who is full of big ideas and constantly hops from one project to the next? If so, you’ve likely encountered a case of what psychologists call shiny-object syndrome. This is when someone is so distracted by the world around them that they’re forever drawn toward new ideas, people and stimuli. Related: 10 Tips to Turn Your Brain Into an Idea Factory You likely know these people. Maybe you’re even one of them. Entrepreneurs are especially prone to shiny-object syndrome. After all, we have a lot on our plates, we love new people, we’re always on the hunt for the n
The Atlantic
2 min read
Psychology

To Remember Random Errands, Turn Them Into a Story

Who among us has not walked into a Target mentally chanting something like “Eggs, shaving cream, toothpaste, toilet paper” only to get home and realize we’ve forgotten the toothpaste? Looks like we’re using mouthwash tonight! If you’ve got a lengthy to-do list, and you’re not ready to commit to bullet journaling or whatever to keep track of it all, Gary Small, the director of the Longevity Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, has a little trick to hold it all in your head: Turn the words into a story. He demonstrated this trick on Saturday at the Aspen Ideas Festival, which is
NPR
1 min read
Religion & Spirituality

Pope Francis Announces New Path To Sainthood

Pope Francis has introduced a new pathway to Catholic sainthood, recognizing those who sacrifice their lives for others. The new category, introduced in a official letter from the pope on Tuesday, is "one of the most significant changes in centuries to the Roman Catholic Church's saint-making procedures," Reuters reports. Before the change, there were three categories that provided a path to sainthood: being killed for the faith (martyrdom), living a life heroically of Christian virtues and having a strong reputation for religious devotion. The process of becoming a saint begins after an indiv
The Wall Street Journal
4 min read
Tech

Robot Psychologists Study Cognition In AIs To Discover How They Learn And Make Errors

Artificial-intelligence engineers have a problem: They often don’t know what their creations are thinking.As artificial intelligence grows in complexity and prevalence, it also grows more powerful. AI already has factored into decisions about who goes to jail and who receives a loan. There are suggestions AI should determine who gets the best chance to live when a self-driving car faces an unavoidable crash.Defining AI is slippery and growing more so, as startups slather the buzzword over whatever they are doing. It is generally accepted as any attempt to ape human intelligence and abilities.O
Popular Science
4 min read
Science

Grandma's Insomnia Might Be A Product Of Evolution

The study was carried out among the Hadza people of Tanzania, who sleep in an environment similar to that of early humans: no artificial lights, heat, or air conditioning. David Samson If your sleep is getting worse with age, evolution might be to blame. A study recently published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B found that humans' age-specific sleep patterns may have evolved to protect mixed-age groups from potential danger in the night. And in this scenario, the elderly members of these groups may have drawn the short straw—their restless sleep made them perfect for the night watch. “Lo
Bloomberg Businessweek
4 min read
Personal Growth

Why a Visa Crackdown Is Bad for Business

Jesse Ellison Kate Bridges should be waiting tables right now. She’s been a server at the lauded farm-to-table restaurant at the Pentagoet Inn in Castine, Maine, for six years, making enough during the summer season to carry her through the year. But in early June she was answering the phone at the inn, telling callers that the restaurant was closed for the foreseeable future. “We depend on that income,” she says. “If the restaurant doesn’t open, I don’t know exactly what I’ll do. But if we don’t have cooks, then we don’t have a restaurant.” The Pentagoet is the oldest continually running b
Popular Science
3 min read

We Still Don’t Really Know Where Dogs Came From

From the looks of this one, somewhere on Tatooine (or possibly heaven). Stocksnap Dogs are too pure for this world. This fact is known. If supernatural explanations were sufficient, we could safely say that dogs descended from the heavens to bring us joy. Reality, as ever, gets in the way with its need for “logic” and “evidence.” The truth is that we created dogs gradually by unconsciously selecting for traits that made wild wolves increasingly puppy-like. Yes, modern dogs are essentially just perma-puppies. That much is clear. What we’re not quite certain about is where and how this happened.
Mic
3 min read
Science

These Are The Health Benefits Of Spending Time By The Ocean

The sea is miraculous. Just the sight of the seemingly boundless body of water is humbling for many. And in the 18th century, the ocean was often regarded as a panacea, with doctors prescribing drinking a pint of sea water to cure everything from leprosy to heatstroke to depression. While modern medicine has yet to support ocean water as a cure-all, there are certainly some major benefits to spending time by the seaside — whether you’re lucky enough to live there or are just visiting. A breath of fresh ocean air might be medicinal. Research has found that patients with cystic fibrosis experie
The Guardian
4 min read
Psychology

If Dogs Could Talk, They’d Tell Us Some Home Truths | John Bradshaw

On 1 April 2010, Google announced a breakthrough for the animal kingdom: an Android App that would allow an impressive range of species, from guinea pig to tortoise, to speak in English. The date was, naturally, significant. Presumably the advertised “animal linguistic database”, against which the “neurobiological acoustics” of the animal’s utterances would be compared, never existed. The “tortoise” file would have been pretty limited, in any case. Now, the idea of talking animals has resurfaced as part of Amazon’s “Shop The Future” concept, but this time it seems more serious. It’s mainly f
Ad Age
3 min read

Marcel Is Just a Baby Compared to JWT's Pangaea

Nearly two years before Publicis dropped its Marcel news at the Cannes Lions, JWT embarked on an artificial intelligence mission of its own. In 2015, the agency quietly began developing Pangaea, an A.I.-powered system that's helping to turn the agency network's 12,000-strong staff into an information and problem-solving resource. Pangaea takes its cues from the supercontinent that inspired its name -- by bringing together the JWT community across all cultures and disciplines. It invites any employee to pose a question or problem to the entire network in the hopes that they'll get useful advice
Ad Age
3 min read
Psychology

You Are Not Your Customer

Most business books will tell you that the secret to success is grounded in becoming a customer of your own products and services. Put yourself in customers' shoes to see how they interact with your product and what the overall experience feels like. The main idea is that being a good customer will make you a good leader. That idea is wrong. All too often, leaders think that their personal experiences with their brand are accurate reflections of all customers' experiences with their brand. They make decisions based on what would personally make them happier, and focus on details of the experie
STAT
4 min read
Psychology

Peer Counseling For Clinicians Provides Immediate Support — And Pays Off For The Hospital

Nursing school prepared my colleagues and me to provide compassionate care for our patients and their families. Sadly, it didn’t prepare us to do that for each other. I’ve spent most of my 19-year career in pediatric nursing at Johns Hopkins Hospital. I have countless memories of brave children, loving and supportive family members, and amazing teamwork. But I also remember sometimes feeling doubtful, sad, fearful, or anxious. What’s missing from those memories is the part where I sat and talked about those feelings with a trusted peer — because that didn’t happen. Things sometimes happen to p
STAT
3 min read
Psychology

Trump’s New York Times Interview Is A Window Into His Psyche

President Trump’s interview this week with the New York Times made headlines for his revelation that he would never have chosen Jeff Sessions as attorney general if he had known Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia investigation. Here at STAT, however, we combed through the transcript of the Oval Office interview for something else: examples of the emotional subtexts that psychiatrists and psychologists told us offer a window into the president’s mind. Overall, Trump was more articulate than he has been in some recent appearances, an important reminder than his tortured syntax might r
STAT
6 min read
Psychology

This Biotech Aims To Transform The Diagnosis Of Mental Illness. Michael Phelps Backs It. Can It Really Work?

A small Australian biotech has drawn big-name backers — including swimming superstar Michael Phelps — to its audacious goal: to develop a quick, cheap, and objective way to diagnose an array of mental illnesses. The tool would be a stunning breakthrough in the field of mental health —  if it works. And there’s the rub. Researchers have been trying for decades to find reliable biomarkers for mental illness — that is, tangible biological clues that conclusively indicate whether a person has a particular psychiatric disease. Effort after effort has failed, leaving doctors to diagnose such conditi
TIME
2 min read
Psychology

Naomi Watts’ Deceptive Therapist Just Can’t Help Herself On Gypsy

D.D. COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY, the field that Naomi Watts’ character Jean Holloway practices on the new Netflix drama Gypsy, is meant to put into place new patterns of thought and behavior in order to break old cycles. No surprise she can’t heal herself: Jean spends her hours off-duty repetitiously gorging on bourbon, spying on her patients’ personal lives and engaging in extramarital liaisons. To craft a new pattern for her thoughts would be to impose one for the first time—she’s all random acts of hedonism. Watts digs into an outsize role that’s the opposite of her current turn on Show