Popular Science
3 min read
Nutrition

Is It Actually Healthy to Stop Eating Red Meat?

Delicious, and often nutritious. But is it necessary? DepositPhotos We all hear about how bad red meat is for both the planet’s health and our own. Planet-wise, there’s no argument: The detrimental effects of greenhouse gases from livestock production on the earth’s atmosphere can’t be overlooked. So, for the month of October, members of the PopSci staff are abstaining from all forms of red meat (#NoRedOctober) for the sake of the environment, and, by extension, for our own good. We have to live here, after all. It’s in our best interest to minimize the cow farts. The health implications of ea
Associated Press
4 min read

Ultra-personal Therapy: Gene Tumor Boards Guide Cancer Care

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Doctors were just guessing a decade ago when they gave Alison Cairnes' husband a new drug they hoped would shrink his lung tumors. Now she takes it, but the choice was no guesswork. Sophisticated gene tests suggested it would fight her gastric cancer, and they were right. Cancer patients increasingly are having their care guided by gene tumor boards, a new version of the hospital panels that traditionally decided whether surgery, radiation or chemotherapy would be best. These experts study the patient's cancer genes and match treatments to mutations that seem to drive the dise
Chicago Tribune
5 min read
Nutrition

Microbes Rule Your Health — And Further Prove That Kids Should Eat Dirt

Humans don't rule the planet. Humans don't even rule their own bodies. During the past 20 years or so, it's become apparent that the guys in charge of everything are a nanometer across and run in packs, or perhaps more accurately, hang out in mobs. These gangs of microorganisms are together referred to as the microbiome, and we're just beginning to understand what these worlds within our world do to us and for us. First, a little data, according to "Dirt Is Good," a recent book by Jack Gilbert, director of the University of Chicago Microbiome Center, and Rob Knight, director of the University
Chicago Tribune
9 min read

Forever Bound By 'Shoebox Baby,' Mother And Nurse Reconnect 12 Years Later

ROCKFORD, Ill. - Neonatal nurse Jeannie Joseph vividly remembers the day the 3-pound infant was brought in a shoebox to the special care nursery at SwedishAmerican hospital in Rockford. The tiny infant wore a baby doll's onesie and was wrapped in a dish towel. Because the boy - born six weeks prematurely - had gone for hours without the warming and nutrients needed for a baby born so early, Joseph and the medical team worked quickly to treat him for hypothermia, dehydration and an infection from the household scissors used to cut his umbilical cord. The following morning, when the baby was sta
STAT
4 min read

Opinion: Canada Is Long Overdue For A National Registry Of Drug Company Payments To Doctors

Ontario recently took a historic step as the first province in Canada to introduce legislation that would shine a light on interactions between drug companies and prescribers. The use of the term “historic” here is not hyperbole, since the extent of payments by the pharmaceutical industry to individual physicians in Canada has never been known. Other countries, such as the United States and France, have been making such information public for a few years now. But Ontario’s bill would provide a wider scope of transparency by including payments to prescribers of all sorts — not just doctors — in
STAT
6 min read

Can You Predict Future Brain Damage? Hundreds Of Pro Fighters Are Helping Researchers Find Out

LAS VEGAS — It’s a study that probably couldn’t be conducted anywhere other than this hot spot for professional combatants, where marquee fights are about as common as Celine Dion concerts. Researchers have enrolled close to 700 mixed martial arts fighters and boxers, both active and retired, in the past six years. The ambitious goal: to learn to identify early signs of trauma-induced brain damage from subtle changes in blood chemistry, brain imaging, and performance tests — changes that may show up decades before visible symptoms such as cognitive impairment, depression, and impulsive behavio
STAT
5 min read

Opinion: Online Sellers Of Designer Drugs Are A Dark Partner In The Opioid Epidemic

One of Max’s friends taught him an easy way to buy shady drugs. What he learned almost killed him, and it opened my eyes to a hiding-in-plain-sight source of dangerous drugs that is amplifying the opioid epidemic. When Max (not his real name) developed pancreatitis a decade ago, his physicians prescribed opioids to ease his extreme pain. When he experienced anxiety between episodes of pancreatitis, his physicians prescribed a benzodiazepine. Benzodiazepines are used to treat anxiety and insomnia, symptoms they can effectively resolve, at least in the short term. Textbooks euphemistically call
Popular Science
4 min read
Wellness

The 12 Most Important Health Innovations Of The Year

This article is a segment of 2017's Best of What's New list. For the complete tabulation of the year's most transformative products and discoveries, head right this way. Lessening breast-reconstruction pain. Airxpanders When a woman undergoes breast reconstruction, surgeons stretch the existing tissue by injecting saline into implanted bladders—a painful process that demands doctor visits, needles, and analgesics. The Aeroform lets women control the process at their own, more-tolerable pace. Patients use a wireless controller to signal a CO2 cartridge to release air that stretches a silicone i
Popular Science
3 min read
Science

Body, Heal Thyself

Jim Cooke Ever since a savanna dweller first slapped mud on a wound to ward off flies—and infection—our frail human bodies have relied on creative intervention to survive. Science has since come up with all manner of potions and procedures (from aspirin to organ transplants to bionic knees) to keep us from falling to pieces. But it turns out the body might be its own best pharmacy; each one of us possesses internal stores of life-extending remediation. Scientists are now learning to access those once locked and guarded inner warehouses to nudge us toward durability. Witness the frontier of usi
Bloomberg Businessweek
3 min read
Food & Wine

Photostat

Fabiola Zerpa and Noris Soto Much has been written about Venezuelans’ daily battles with food shortages since the oil-rich Latin American country sank into economic chaos a few years ago: the plunging caloric intake, surging malnutrition, and, in some extreme cases, starvation. But it’s difficult to comprehend what it looks and feels like up close—to see a neighbor’s round face slowly hollow out or notice how your father’s favorite T-shirt now hangs loosely on his shrinking frame. We photographed Venezuelans, predominantly from blue-collar neighborhoods in Caracas and its suburbs, and asked
Men's Health
12 min read

Hack Your DNA And 19 Other Ways To Be Your Own Doctor

Onno Faber was 33 when he woke one day to a terrible sound in his left ear. Every noise around him, even a toilet flush, sounded like breaking glass. A series of tests produced no answers, until the day he walked into a doctor’s office and saw a bright circle—a tumor—in the image of his brain on the computer screen. And Onno thought, “Fuck!” Onno had neurofibromatosis type 2, or NF2, a rare disorder in which tumors grow on the cells surrounding certain nerves within the central nervous system that enable hearing, balance, and movement. It wouldn’t kill him, the doctors said, but in time he wou
STAT
4 min read
Nutrition

Opinion: The FDA’s Plan To Delay The New Food Label Is A Bad Move For Public Health

I’m confused — and mad — about the Food and Drug Administration’s plan to delay the implementation of the much-needed new food label, the iconic rectangle of nutrition information that adorns food packages. Eighteen months ago, then-first lady Michelle Obama announced that she was “thrilled” that the FDA had finalized a new and improved label. It was going to be required on all packaged foods by July 2018. But now the FDA has proposed pushing back the required date to January 2020. I am scratching my head on this one. Truthfully, in this era of transparency, I need to disclose that I am actual
India Today
4 min read
Food & Wine

8 Things To Look Forward To

1. Eat and Play Cafe Unlocked is one of those places where you'll be tempted to lock your phone screen and spend time on conversations, games and good food. Within two months of its launch, the place has already become the youth's favourite hangout. Unlocked has designed its own adventure hunt where participants have to unlock the fictional mystery of the missing explorer Alexandra Lionheart who fell in love with a Gujarat prince and then disappeared. In the 60 minute game, participants decode clues to find keys to locks that open up new treasures. It takes you through intriguing puzzles and
BBC History Magazine
2 min read
Society

“By Age 35, 8 Per Cent of Chester’s Population Had Been Infected With Syphilis”

My research focuses on Chester between 1773 and 1775. My investigations into the rate at which adult residents were admitted to Chester’s infirmary for treatment of the ‘pox’ (what we now know as syphilis) suggest that, by age 35, almost exactly 8 per cent of the city’s population (which numbered 14,713 in 1774) had contracted the infection. By comparison, less densely populated rural settlements within a 10-mile radius of the city, in west Cheshire and north-east Wales, had a rate of just under 1 per cent. This is the first time anyone has been able to make quantitative estimates of the preva
Men's Health
2 min read

The Health Report

Colon cancer and heart disease may strike simultaneously, according to new research from Johns Hopkins University. People with colon polyps were 2.7 times as likely as those with clean colons to also have highly obstructed arteries. That’s because cardiac risk factors (inflammation, high blood sugar, high cholesterol) also endanger your basement plumbing. If you’re diagnosed with heart disease, make colorectal cancer screening a priority. Conversely, if your colonoscopy reveals polyps, get screened for cardiovascular risk factors, says study author Eliseo Guallar, M.D. Fig. 2 Too much time thu
Men's Health
2 min read

Can the World Be Your Doctor?

Being a doctor gives Justin Moore, M.D., an advantage when diagnosing his own symptoms. But even that expertise didn’t help him get rid of a rash that had dogged him for 15 years. Steroids initially cleared the rash, but Dr. Moore had to keep increasing the dosage to find relief. So after consulting dermatologists without success, he tried something new: He paid to join an online service called CrowdMed, where he posted his history and symptoms and invited medical problem solvers across the Internet to help him. “I had an answer in two days,” he says. He had atypical psoriasis, and the recomme
Los Angeles Times
3 min read
Wellness

'Guns Kill People,' and Leading Doctors Want to Treat Them Like Any Other Threat to Public Health

The doctors who lead the medical profession's debates on how best to preserve and restore our health are done with moments of silence in the face of gun-related violence. In the wake of a mass shooting that killed 59 people and wounded hundreds more in Las Vegas, they neither minced words nor observed political niceties in describing the threat that firearms pose to Americans' health. "Guns kill people," Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor in chief of the influential Journal of the American Medical Association, and a team of colleagues wrote in an editorial published online Monday. "Guns do not make i
People
1 min read
Wellness

Heidi Klum

REPORTED BY NICOLE SANDS The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is a great organization that is trying to prevent cases of AIDS in children worldwide, as nearly 400 babies become infected with HIV each day. Elizabeth and her daughter Ariel died from the disease, but her son Jake—who contracted the virus in utero—is still alive and helping to advance his mother’s dream of finding a cure. The annual A Time for Heroes Festival on Oct. 29 in Los Angeles is a big carnival put on each year to help raise tons of money for research. I was first asked to do one of the booths 15 or 16 years ago
Chicago Tribune
2 min read
Nutrition

Singing Cantaloupe's Praises in a Refreshing Sparkler

Cantaloupe means singing wolf. Not the scene that jumps to mind when slicing open the dazzling melon. And yet, no secret. Slice open the word to find canta, "sing" in many a language, and loupe, "wolf." Apparently the melon is named after a town, which is named after the wolves who once serenaded its hills. Perhaps they were howling to that other orange orb, the moon. Perhaps they were singing of lost love, of melancholy. Perhaps they were praising the tasty fruit balls that littered the ground. Lovely, they must have yelped, and sweet. Cantaloupe is too bright, too fragrant, too cheerful to i
Oxygen
6 min read
Food & Wine

Powell Power

COUPLES WHO SWEAT TOGETHER, STAY TOGETHER! IN FACT, SHARING A COMMON GOAL CAN MAKE YOUR PARTNERSHIP STRONGER. Are you in? Sign up by October 29, 2017, to enter the America’s Fittest Couple Challenge 2, and you and your partner have the chance to win: A dream trip to paradise — enjoy the sun, sand and waves of Hawaii The ultimate partner workout — a weekend getaway to train with Heidi and Chris Powell For details, go to oxygenmag.com/fittestcouple2 HEIDI AND CHRIS POWELL are best-known as transformation experts on the long-running show Extreme Weight Loss, having helped severely overweight indi
Oxygen
2 min read
Food & Wine

Ask the Nutritionist

A little but not much. Heavy metals and bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in plastics, for instance, have been detected in human sweat. But there’s no evidence that sweating treatments, like saunas and sweat lodges, remove enough toxins — such as heavy metals and other toxins that enter your body through food, air, alcohol, drugs, tobacco, personal-care products and stress — to improve your health. Rather than removing these substances through sweat, which is 99 percent water, your liver and kidneys remove far more toxins than your sweat glands. People who have dangerously high levels of hea
Oxygen
3 min read
Science

Culture Club

there is an old adage that states, “You are what you eat.” But these words of wisdom aren’t entirely accurate. In reality, you are only as good as your digestive system. This realization is what fuels the probiotic industry that is expected to exceed $64 billion by 2023, and with good reason. Research shows that the health of the digestive system dramatically affects digestion and absorption of nutrients, immune function, skin health, cognitive ability, metabolism, and even muscle mass and endurance. So if you’re ignoring beneficial bacteria within your dietary plan, you’re selling yourself sh
Oxygen
8 min read
Food & Wine

Blade RUNNERS

the trusty countertop appliance known as the blender might be a champ at whizzing together your postworkout recovery shakes, but if you use it for little more than blitzing protein powder with frozen berries, you’re seriously selling this gizmo short. A blender can be a multitasking kitchen workhorse if there ever was one. From pancakes to burgers to waistlinefriendly desserts, those blades are ready to help you whip up ultra-fast healthy and delicious around-the-clock meals that go way beyond frosty drinks. To bring you up to speed on the versatility of your blender, start by mixing up these
Oxygen
2 min read
Self-Improvement

Mind-body Strategies To Tackle Pain

Just 15 minutes of mindfulness, hypnosis and education about pain management reduced pain in hospital patients, researchers at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City found. In the study of 244 people experiencing acute pain, mindfulness helped reduce their pain by 23 percent, and hypnosis proved even more helpful, reducing it by 29 percent. “Hypnosis may work by using imagery and suggestions to overlay pleasant sensations onto the painful bodypart,” says lead author Eric Garland, Ph.D., professor and associate dean for research at the University of Utah. Overall, patients felt more pleasant
People
5 min read
Wellness

My Battle with Sickle-Cell Disease

It’s not always easy being a rock-star mom. Now touring with her bandmate Rozonda “Chilli” Thomas, Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins—a founding member of the popular ’90s girl group TLC—has been getting unhappy phone calls from her daughter Chase, 16, back home in Los Angeles. “Chase did our make-up on the first leg of the tour, but she has to go to school,” says Watkins, 47. “She’s so upset! She’s like, ‘I miss Chance’”—the little brother, 2, whom the R&B star adopted in May 2016 and has brought on tour. “I’m like, ‘What about your mom?’ It’s all about Chance! He’s a ray of sunshine.” That’s a good kin
STAT
4 min read
Politics

The Graham-Cassidy Bill Is a Threat to Children

Ethan’s parents couldn’t be more enthusiastic about their son’s operation. “Until they see his scar, no one even knows he was born with a heart problem and had open heart surgery,” they tell me. “He runs around just like his friends and is the fastest skater on his hockey team.” As his pediatric cardiologist, I smile as Ethan’s parents proudly tell me how well their son is doing. I helped their family get to this point, but so did their having access to quality health care since the day Ethan was born through All Kids, an Illinois program that provides comprehensive health care regardless of h