The Atlantic
9 min read
Entrepreneurship

Why Does Sweden Have So Many Start-Ups?

STOCKHOLM—This is a high-tax, high-spend country, where employees receive generous social benefits and ample amounts of vacation time. Economic orthodoxy would suggest the dynamics of a welfare state like Sweden would be detrimental to entrepreneurship: Studies have found that the more a country’s government spends per capita, the smaller the number of start-ups it tends to have per worker—the idea being that high income taxes reduce entrepreneurs’ expected gains and thus their incentive to launch new companies. And yet Sweden excels in promoting the formation of ambitious new businesses, on a
Inc.
4 min read
Entrepreneurship

Set Your Own Salary

VICTORIA FINKLE WHEN ELIZABETH SOPHER and Caroline Portis decided to commit full time to their Denver-based bedding business, QuickZip, they knew pay cuts were in order. As established professionals in their 50s—Sopher was an environmental scientist and Portis was a chief financial officer for a large company—they settled on salaries of $125,000 each. But eight months later, when they joined the MergeLane accelerator for women-led businesses in February 2015, they realized their salaries were way too high. As MergeLane CEO Sue Heilbronner told the founders, “You should be paying yourself eno
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Entrepreneurship

6 Ways You Are Holding Your Business Back -- and What to Do About It

Launching and growing a business is never easy -- especially when it's time to let go and let others do some of the work. Sometimes, you can actually be holding back your company from growth. So, what do you do if you're the problem? Six entrepreneurs chime in.  “I used to review each line of copy we put out in the world -- then my team told me I was creating a large bottleneck. I had to learn to tolerate incongruities with the way I think our brand should come to life and the way it actually does. Today, I see most brand creative when our customers do. It’s not easy, but empowering our team g
Inc.
3 min read
Entrepreneurship

Women Rock Florida’s Business Scene

It was smooth sailing for Kay Stephenson, co-founder and CEO of Datamaxx Group, for her first 10 years in business. Her company provides secure communications services to law enforcement and security companies—and competition from bigger companies was minimal. But that changed dramatically after September 11, 2001. Rather than confronting the increasing number of large competitors head-on, she freely shared her experience and technology, deftly positioning Tallahassee-based Datamaxx, a certified woman-owned business (WOB), as an invaluable partner. That partnership made those large companies
Inc.
9 min read
Entrepreneurship

The New New Girls’ Club

IN A SMALL LOFT SPACE in downtown New York City, 13 women sit cross-legged on cushions. A noise machine hums in the background. Small succulents and crystals line the room, along with overstuffed purses carrying laptops. At the center is Deborah Hanekamp—or Mama Medicine, as she is known—a healer-slash-entrepreneur in a muumuu who is guiding the women in her studio through an after-work meditation. The space is calming, except for the occasional sound of women arriving a bit late, finishing up business calls on cell phones. As those in the group introduce themselves, we learn there is a gastr
Inc.
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

Women Founders, Women Leaders

YOU CANNOT READ THIS month’s special report on women entrepreneurs and fail to be reminded—as if anyone in 2017 needed reminding—that there is no gender to creativity, determination, and guts. The report, which starts on page 71, singles out more than 30 women founders of businesses of all sizes, at all stages of growth, and in every imaginable industry. Those industries most definitely include tech (apparently, some people in tech still do need reminding). If there are any doubts, I suggest reading senior editor Maria Aspan’s profile of Therese Tucker (page 94), whose $123 million software c
Entrepreneur
5 min read
Entrepreneurship

Scaling the Right Way: The Founders of Chopt, Dos Toros and Dig Inn Share Their Secrets

What’d you have for lunch today? If you live on the East Coast, you may have grabbed a fresh marketbowl from Dig Inn or a salad from Chopt. Or maybe a folded quesadilla from Dos Toros. These brands are steady climbers in the fast-casual industry, which is now worth $50 billion. That may be a small slice of the $800 billion restaurant industry, but it’s growing fast and changing the mindset of eaters across the country by offering high-quality food, often sourced locally and always served quickly. And while it may take a place like Dos Toros less than a minute to build your burrito, the operati
The New York Times
6 min read
Entrepreneurship

As Sexual Harassment Scandals Spook Men, It Can Backfire for Women

In Silicon Valley, some male investors have declined one-on-one meetings with women, or rescheduled them from restaurants to conference rooms. On Wall Street, certain senior men have tried to avoid closed-door meetings with junior women. And in TV news, some male executives have scrupulously minded their words in conversations with female talent. In interviews, the men describe a heightened caution because of recent sexual harassment cases, and they worry that one accusation, or misunderstood comment, could end their careers. But their actions affect women’s careers, too — potentially deprivin
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Entrepreneurship

Rising to the Challenge: Incubator Looks to Help Women Immigrants Start Their Own Food Business

Jessamyn Waldman Rodriguez spent much of her career in NGOs, and learned that the food industry held many opportunities for low-income immigrant women -- if only they knew how to break in. So in 2007, she found a way to open those doors: She’d bake bread. She created Hot Bread Kitchen, a nonprofit that sells its bread across New York City, and the nation via its website. Proceeds would fund a Bakers-in-Training program, to teach these women how to make artisan bread, as well as job skills like English and math. The product took off at retailers like Whole Foods and Dean & DeLuca, and many of t
Inc.
4 min read
Entrepreneurship

Be Smart About Being Charitable

COELI CARR BRYAN ZMIJEWSKI DISCOVERED shortly after he launched Zurb, a digital design firm in Campbell, California, that his company’s pro bono efforts were being stymied by red tape. His solution? A dynamic blitz of volunteerism called Zurb Wired, an annual project that has employees help a Bay Area non-profit build a marketing campaign over a dizzying 24-hour period. (Last year it was Life Services Alternatives, which buys homes for people with disabilities.) Zurb churns out websites, posters, signage, and blog and YouTube posts. “Prioritize your expertise so you can significantly increase
India Today
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

Nobody Is Born an Entrepreneur, It Is Not Genetic: Ronnie Screwvala

Ronnie Screwvala, entrepreneur, on breaking new ground, re inventing oneself and giving back to society. Q. You have committed Rs 150 crore of your own capital to UpGrad, your new education venture. Will you be betting big on the education space and do you think it has potential? A. My main focus for the next decade is to disrupt the education space with UpGrad, as well as to give back via the Swades Foundation [for rural India]. The online education space, especially in higher education, is ripe for disruption. This market is [potentially] massive once it's done with credibility, engaging co
NPR
3 min read
Entrepreneurship

Co-Working Spaces Are Redefining What It Means To Go To The Office

Michael Silvers has worked at home and in corporate offices but prefers his small, rented glass-walled shared working space in downtown Washington, D.C. "Every office that I've worked in, you're kind of down in your own little hole, and you don't really interact as much with other types of businesses," he says. Not so at his WeWork office, a co-working space that has led to serendipitous meetings for Silvers and his co-founder, who run ClearCodeX, an app-development firm. They recruited a business partner, another WeWork entrepreneur, and learned a far more efficient way to develop software
TIME
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

6 CEOs on How Business Can Do Better

THROUGH OUR CEO INITIATIVE, TIME AND FORTUNE WILL SPEAK WITH TOP LEADERS OF INDUSTRY ABOUT how they, their companies and organizations across the world can “do well by doing good.” Here, six participants in this year’s Sept. 25 conference offer their insights into what’s next for socially conscious corporate strategies: To become inclusive, open up about failure BLAKE IRVING, CEO and board director of GoDaddy Too many companies just issue reports announcing our micro-successes when it comes to diversity, while shielding our defeats—which we all have. For instance, each year GoDaddy shares t
The Christian Science Monitor
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

The Start-Ups in an Upstart US Economy

Since the end of the Great Recession in 2009, the United States has not only enjoyed a steady economic recovery, it has also improved on many key measures that drive future prosperity. That fact is reflected in its position on the Global Competitiveness Index. The US went from third to second this year, coming in just behind Switzerland. The main reason for this progress is that Americans have maintained a “vibrant innovation ecosystem” that helps improve worker productivity, according to the World Economic Forum, which publishes the Global Competitiveness Report with country rankings. Just ho
Business Today
5 min read
Entrepreneurship

Beyond The Obvious

After working for 12 years, Lakshmi Ravindran decided to take a break from work to look after her two children. Two years later, she decided to return to the corporate world and started looking for work. But there was a problem. While she was at home, the world had moved ahead, with the industry (her last job title was relationship manager, commercial banking, HSBC) swearing by buzzwords deep tech and blockchain, data analytics, et all. She knew she would have to reinvent herself. At a loss, sometime around August last year, she learnt that S.P. Jain Institute for Management Research, or SPJ
Business Today
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

B Schools In A Slowing Economy

If you were to go only by the placement records of the top 10 odd business schools in the country, you would never think that economic growth has been slowing down for over a year now. The best B schools the top 50 or so manage to place their students at good salaries year after year, whether the economy is booming or in a depressed state. Go lower down the list and the economic conditions start showing a far greater impact on the placement records. In good years, no one has a placement problem. In years when the economy is not doing great, securing 100 per cent campus placements and at
Mic
6 min read
Entrepreneurship

5 Ways Female Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in a Man’s Startup World

Have you heard about “Keith Mann,” the fake male co-founder that Penelope Gazin and Kate Dwyer, co-founders of e-commerce site Witchsy, told Fast Company they invented? After one too many condescending emails from male developers and designers, the female entrepreneurs created a fictional frontman who could step in and correspond with difficult (read: sexist) people. The result? “Kevin” got faster and more polite responses than the female co-founders, which essentially kicked down doors that had previously been closed to the female-led business. Whether you want to high-five Gazin and Dwyer fo
Business Today
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

Fuelling Start ups

Padmaja Ruparel has a simple philosophy in life. She calls it playing the game: "It is not what one gains; it is what one creates." Ruparel has built institutions, and seen the gains flow. She involved herself with The Indus Entrepreneurs (TiE) around 1999, when "people made errors spelling 'entrepreneurship'; she co founded the Indian Angel Network (IAN) in 2006, when high net worth individuals typically asked what was "religious" about angel investing. IAN is today the world's largest business angel network with 450 investors. It has invested in 135 companies and cites an internal rate of re
Business Today
6 min read
Society

The Long Climb Uphill

I was disappointed to hear my daughter say one day that one of her first time clients had presumed that a male subordinate reporting directly to her was her boss," says veteran banker Naina Lal Kidwai. "In her initial interactions with the client she had to work quite hard to set right this misconception." In the 1980s when Kidwai herself was climbing the corporate ladder, such a presumption would have been no surprise. But that it was still being made by some, despite all the glass ceilings broken and peaks conquered by women in the last three decades, dismayed her. "Once informed, clients a
Fortune
3 min read
Entrepreneurship

Bringing ‘Hard Science’ To The Masses

IN 2010, AS THE DUST from the financial crisis settled, three women working in disparate parts of the economy noticed that startups in “hard science” (think biology or chemistry rather than tech) weren’t getting the attention they deserved from big investors. They joined forces with the foundation of Peter Thiel, the well-known contrarian investor, to launch Breakout Labs, an incubator program to help such companies turn their ideas into viable businesses. Seven years later, those same three women want to be the big investors whom they used to court. In July they officially launched Breakout
Fortune
7 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

The Four Pillars Of Moral Leadership

THE ANIMATING SPIRIT OF BUSINESS has always been an ambition to do big things—to build something valuable, to solve a difficult problem, to provide a useful service, to explore the frontiers of human possibility. At its essence, therefore, business is about human endeavor. And for humans to endeavor together, there must be an animating ethos and ethic of endeavor. But it’s getting harder for leaders to foster this ethos, and to lead through it on the way to doing big things. That’s because they’re trying to do so in a world that is not just rapidly changing, but in one that has been dramatica
Fortune
7 min read
Entrepreneurship

Ford Finds a New Leader, By Design

SOME COMPANIES take a cookie-cutter approach to selecting their CEOs. They might favor home-grown talent, for instance, or engineers steeped in the company’s products, or sales-people who excel at spinning a corporate yarn. The next CEO tends to look like the previous CEO, and will be followed by someone cut from the same cloth. The Ford Motor Co., on the other hand, follows no discernible pattern at all. In the past two decades alone it has toggled from an operations whiz (Jacques Nasser) to a young scion of its founding family (Bill Ford) to an exec who was an automotive neophyte (Alan Mula
Associated Press
2 min read
Politics

Study: US Government Its Own Worst Enemy

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new analysis by the Harvard Business School outlines why U.S. voters are so frustrated with their political leaders — there is a lack of genuine competition between Republicans and Democrats to deliver actual results on major policies such as education, health care, taxes and infrastructure. The two major U.S. political parties have distorted the rules of elections and the legislative process to avoid competing directly with each other, according to the analysis released Wednesday. This has created a political leadership that increasingly emphasizes differences rather than
The Atlantic
5 min read
Entrepreneurship

Before Vibrators Were Mainstream

Nowadays, sex-positivity is mainstream: Amazon sells vibrators for as little as a few dollars, and the honest, open-minded sex-advice podcast Savage Love is consistently at the top of downloads charts. There was a time, not all that long ago, when such things were not quite so out in the open. In her new book, Vibrator Nation: How Feminist Sex-Toy Stories Changed the Business of Pleasure, Lynn Comella traces the link between the contemporary adult-toy industry and the small groups of feminist retailers who, starting in the 1970s, started their own vibrator stores explicitly for women. In the b
TechLife News
5 min read
Entrepreneurship

As Robots Edge Into Workplace, Free Money Idea Takes Hold

Driverless trucks. Factory robots. Delivery drones. Virtual personal assistants. As technological innovations increasingly edge into the workplace, many people fear that robots and machines are destined to take jobs that human beings have held for decades. For many affected workers, retraining might be out of reach -unavailable, unaffordable or inadequate. What then? Enter the idea of a universal basic income, the notion that everyone should be able to receive a stream of income to live on, regardless of their employment or economic status. It isn’t an idea that seems likely to gain traction n